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Anthurium

SCENTIFIC NAME: Anthurium adraeanum or scherzerianum

KNOWN AS: Flamingo Flower, Tail Flower, Laceleaf

CLIMATE (LOCATION): South America | Subtropical

DESCRIPTION: These plants have leaves that are heart-shaped and green. They also have a long lasting spike that is showy. The spike is often confused for a flower petal.

Moderate difficulty & pet safe

Anthurium Plant Care

Lighting

Light Requirement: High Light (Bright Indirect Light)

Anthurium plants do best in bright, indirect light. They shouldn't be put in direct sunlight because it can burn the leaves. The right amount of light can come from a spot near a north- or east-facing window, or from an LED grow light. f the plant is too far from a source of light, its leaves will start to droop and turn yellow. If there is too much light, the plant's leaves can get burned and change color.

Watering

Quick Tip: Water until water comes out of drainage holes. Allow top 2 inches of soil to completely dry between waterings.

Anthuriums are tropical plants that require specific watering techniques to thrive indoors. One of the most important aspects of watering Anthuriums is ensuring that the soil is moist but not waterlogged. Overwatering can cause root rot and kill the plant, so it is important to let the soil dry out slightly before watering again. The best way to determine if your Anthurium needs water is to check the top inch of soil - if it feels dry to the touch, it's time to water. When watering, pour water into the pot until it begins to drain out of the bottom, ensuring that the entire root system is saturated. Allow any excess water to drain away, as sitting in water can also cause root rot. Additionally, using room temperature or lukewarm water is recommended, as cold water can shock the roots. Watering frequency will depend on factors such as the size of the plant, the pot size, and the environmental conditions, but on average, anthuriums should be watered every 7-10 days.

Temperature

Preferred Temperature: 60º - 90º

Anthurium plants prefer warm temperatures and thrive in an environment with a consistent temperature range of 60 to 90°F (15 to 32°C). They cannot tolerate temperatures below 50°F (10°C) or above 95°F (35°C) for extended periods. It is best to keep Anthurium plants away from drafts and sudden temperature changes as they can cause stress to the plant and lead to leaf drops or other problems. Providing consistent temperatures and avoiding extreme fluctuations will help keep Anthurium plants healthy.

Humidity

Preferred Humidity: 60 - 70%; High Humidity

Anthuriums thrive in high-humidity environments and can be a bit tricky to care for if you're not familiar with their needs. To keep your Anthurium healthy and happy, it's important to maintain the right humidity levels in your home or greenhouse. It's essential to understand that anthuriums prefer high humidity levels ranging from 70-80%. You can achieve this by placing a humidifier near the plant or using a pebble tray filled with water beneath the plant. The water will evaporate, creating a humid environment around the plant. A hygrometer can be used to help you maintain a consistent humidity level, which is important for anthuriums' health. Be sure to keep the plant away from drafty areas or heat sources, which can cause the leaves to dry out and damage the plant. Enough air circulation is required to make sure fungal growth cannot happen on the Anthuriums, basically do not allow for breezy or stagnant air.

Additional Plant Care

Propagation
Anthurium plants can be propagated through division, stem cuttings, or seeds. Dividing is the easiest and most popular method, which involves separating a mature plant into several smaller ones by carefully pulling them apart. Stem cuttings can also be taken by cutting a healthy stem with a few leaves attached and rooting it in a moist potting mix. Seeds can be collected from the plant’s berries, which should be allowed to mature and dry out before harvesting.
Toxicity
Anthurium, also known as flamingo flower or laceleaf, is toxic. Therefore, it is important to keep Anthurium out of reach of children and pets.
Repotting
Anthurium plants prefer to be slightly root-bound, so repotting is typically only necessary when the plant has outgrown its container or if the soil has become too compacted, you can tell this is happening when water stops draining down into the plant quickly. The best time to repot Anthuriums is in the spring or summer when the plant is actively growing, this will help it recover from shock. To repot, first, select a container that is only slightly larger than the current one and has drainage holes. Then, fill the bottom of the container with fresh, well-draining potting mix. Carefully remove the plant from its current container and gently loosen any tangled roots. Place the plant in the new container and fill in the remaining space with fresh potting mix, being careful not to bury the crown of the plant. Water thoroughly and place in a bright, indirect light location to allow the plant to adjust to its new pot.
Pruning
Anthurium plants prefer to be slightly root-bound, so repotting is typically only necessary when the plant has outgrown its container or if the soil has become too compacted, you can tell this is happening when water stops draining down into the plant quickly. The best time to repot Anthuriums is in the spring or summer when the plant is actively growing, this will help it recover from shock. To repot, first, select a container that is only slightly larger than the current one and has drainage holes. Then, fill the bottom of the container with fresh, well-draining potting mix. Carefully remove the plant from its current container and gently loosen any tangled roots. Place the plant in the new container and fill in the remaining space with fresh potting mix, being careful not to bury the crown of the plant. Water thoroughly and place in a bright, indirect light location to allow the plant to adjust to its new pot.
Fertilizer
Anthurium plants need regular fertilization to promote healthy growth and vibrant blooms. Use a balanced, water-soluble fertilizer that is high in phosphorus to encourage flowering. Fertilize every 4 to 6 weeks during the growing season, which typically runs from spring through summer. During the fall and winter, reduce fertilization to every 6 to 8 weeks. Always follow the manufacturer's instructions for the specific fertilizer you are using, and make sure to dilute it to the recommended strength before applying it to the soil around the plant, almost all fertilizers require dilution. Avoid getting fertilizer on the leaves or flowers, as this can cause burns or other damage.
Soil
Anthurium plants grow well in well-draining soil that is rich in organic matter. The ideal soil type for Anthurium plants should be a mix of peat moss, perlite, and coarse sand in equal parts. This type of soil allows for proper drainage while retaining moisture to provide a humid environment for the plant. Anthuriums prefer slightly acidic soil with a pH between 5.5 and 6.5. It is important to ensure that the soil is not compacted, as this can impede proper drainage and result in root rot.
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Hanging Heights

Anthurium Lighting Requirements: High Light (Bright Indirect Light)

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